Jeb Corliss flies through Tianmen Cave in China

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Jeb Corliss Tianmen Cave

Fly through mountain cave in China

Jeb Corliss Tianmen Cave

Take a look behind the scenes as Jeb Corliss fufills his quest to make history. The first person to fly through Heaven’s Gate in Tianmen Mountain, China.

Tianmen Mountain is a mountain located within Tianmen Mountain National Park, Zhangjiajie, in northwestern Hunan Province, China.

A cablecar was constructed by the French company Poma from nearby Zhangjiajie railway station to the top of the mountain. Tianmen Mountain Cableway is claimed in tourist publications as the “longest passenger cableway of high mountains in the world”, with 98 cars and a total length of 7,455 metres and ascent of 1,279 metres. The highest gradient is an unusual 37 degrees. Tourists can walk on kilometres of paths built onto the cliff face at the top of the mountain, including sections with glass floors. An 11 kilometres road with 99 bends also reaches the top of the mountain and takes visitors to Tianmen cave, a natural hole in the mountain of a height of 131.5 metres.

A large temple is also located on the summit with chairlift or footpath access. The original temple here was built in the Tang Dynasty. Today a more recent construction with Tang dynasty architecture occupies the site and includes a vegetarian restaurant in the 10000 sq mi of setting.

On September 25, 2011 Jeb Corliss glided through the 30 m wide archway in the mountain using a wingsuit. The flight began from a helicopter at 1,800 m, and ended with a safe landing on a nearby bridge. The World Wingsuit League held the first and second World Wingsuit Championships in Tianmen. On October 8, 2013, during a training jump for the second world championships, Viktor Kováts plunged to his death when he was unable to open his parachute.

In August 2016, a glass skywalk overlooking Tongtian Avenue, called the “Coiling Dragon Cliff, was opened to the public.

Skyliners: I Believe I can Fly – a film by Sebastien Montaz

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Skyliners: Alpina Watches

A film by Sebastien Montaz

Skyliners Tancrède Melet

Sebastien Montaz has been filming the Skyliners and their Alpina watches on an incredible exploration into the world of free flight. Tancrède Melet, Julien Millot, Seb and Antoine are pioneers in ‘highlining’ – a vertiginous combination of climbing, slackline and tightrope walking.

They travelled from their home in Chamonix to their training ground in the Verdon gorge, testing the limits for our ultimate goal…
They rigged highlines on the skyscrapers of Paris, and finally came to the spectacular cliffs and fjords of Norway.

Months of training led the Skyliners team to attempt their dream of complete freedom… the freedom of flight !

Continue reading Skyliners: I Believe I can Fly – a film by Sebastien Montaz

Chris Douggs McDougall – What Does BASE Stand for?

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Chris Douggs McDougall

What Does B.A.S.E Stand for? Check out the video to find out the answer!

Chris Douggs McDougall

Base jumping from buildings: Benidorm in Spain and Kuala Lumpur in Malaysia, antennas in Switzerland and USA, spans in Croatia and Twin Falls in USA and mountains – Riglos in Spain and Monte Brento in Italy.

Chris Douggs McDougall about himself:
“My life has been devoted to BASE jumping and skydiving for over 16 years now – 16 years that have brought me endless joy and adventure and taught me what living life to the fullest really means. BASE jumping proves that nothing is impossible if you chase your dreams with passion and determination.

My chosen adventure sports have taken me to all corners of the globe, exploring some of nature’s true wonders in the company of the world’s most unique, inspirational people. I created BASEdreams to share my experiences of these incredible sports, in the hope that they may inspire even just one person to break free from the constraints of society and achieve what their hearts most desire – whatever that may be.
While only a handful of us will experience BASE jumping, we’re all plunging through the freefall of life. And we have to make the most of it.”

A legend – Dwain Weston

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Dwain Weston

A daredevil basejumper

Dwain Weston – should be an inspiration to many of us. This video is dedicate to him, his family and his friends. Scenes are extracted from a documentary called “fearless”.

Dwain Weston was an Australian skydiver, BASE jumper and wingsuiter. On 5 October 2003, while participating in the inaugural Go Fast Games, Weston was killed attempting to fly over the Royal Gorge Bridge near Cañon City, Colorado.

Weston, who was originally from Sydney, Australia, worked as a computer analyst. He made over 1200 BASE jumps in ten different countries, including a jump from the 73rd floor of the Petronas Twin Towers in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, and was considered one of the best and most experienced BASE jumpers in the world. In 2002, he won the world title in BASE jumping. He served as president of the Australian BASE Association (ABA). He was among the first BASE jumpers to introduce acrobatic elements in the jumps, and was a pioneer in various jumping techniques.

On 5 October 2003, while participating in the inaugural Go Fast Games, Weston was killed attempting to fly over the Royal Gorge Bridge near Cañon City, Colorado. Weston was wearing a wingsuit, a skydiving suit with fabric extended below the arms to the body and between the legs to catch air allowing for horizontal travel when skydiving. Weston was to go over the bridge while fellow skydiver Jeb Corliss was to go under it. Just prior to the jump, Weston said to Corliss, “Whatever happens happens”.

Miscalculating the winds and his distance from the bridge, Weston struck a railing while traveling an estimated 120 mph (190 km/h), severing one of his legs at the hip. Spectators on the bridge witnessed the event. Some filmed the accident and captured the reaction of the crowd and the damage to the bridge. At impact with the bridge, Weston’s parachute deployed and he fell onto a rock face about 100 yards from the bottom of the gorge. While either impact would likely have killed him independently, it is assumed he was dead after impact with the bridge.